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Deephers and Diabetes

For 10 years, I have been living with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Diabetes isn’t always a visible disease; its hidden in purses while checking blood sugar, or crawling out of bed by yourself to chug milk at 3 am. Through all these moments, I have become accustomed to the solitude of my disease and relying on myself to get through the issues and struggles of having T1D. This had been my life for 10 years, letting a few people in throughout the years, but keeping my true life and feelings towards diabetes to myself. I thought this would be my life, but then I moved to college and everything began to change.When I came to Northeastern University in Spring of 2016, I knew that I wanted to join a sorority. I wanted to have that bond and experience the sisterhood I had seen in so many Hollywood movies. I became a sister of Delta Phi Epsilon (DPhiE) sorority shortly after arriving to campus. When I joined, I was nervous to speak about my diabetes because it wasn’t my favorite fun fact and I worried that people would think I was weird. However, once I did say that one phrase that...
Editors’ Note: MannKind Corp., the company which produces Afrezza, is a CDN Corporate Member. One of our CDN students who uses Afrezza as part of his diabetes management wrote this blog about his experience. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) the summer before my senior year of high school. Fast forward two years later, and I am still using the Novolog and Lantus pens I started out with. I am perfectly content with using insulin pens, and do not have much interest in trying a pump right now. While I had learned to deal with all of the inconveniences of giving shots before a meal, I am never opposed to looking for things to lighten the burden. One of the most annoying things about giving shots is when I would be dressed up in a sport coat, with no easy access to give a shot. I would be wearing a tucked in long sleeve button down shirt, and tucking and untucking it was a big hassle. This makes having T1D even more frustrating than it already is.I had learned about a new type of insulin, Afrezza, an inhaled insulin that had recently received FDA approval! I immediately wanted to try...
I was diagnosed with T1D when I was three years old. That was almost fourteen years ago, and I am currently a senior in high school. Over the summer, I interned at the College Diabetes Network (CDN) headquarters in Boston. After my internship, I shifted my focus into my college applications. Like every other part of my life, diabetes had to be factored into my choices.My first college tour was during the summer before my junior year. In the year and a half since then, I can honestly say that my views on college have changed entirely. Many of the schools I expected to like ending up being completely wrong for me. On the flip side, I fell in love with schools that I didn't even want to tour. After going on a few tours, I learned to go with my gut. If I could imagine myself going to the school, it was put on the application list. If I didn’t feel like it was a good fit, it was cut from the list. All that being said, I followed the advice that every high schooler hears: to have reach, match, and safety schools. I have applied to twelve schools...
 Editor's note: apply for the 2018 CDN Annual Retreat today! https://www.tfaforms.com/4654442I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) when I was 11 years old. I was in middle school at the time, and I was only able to communicate with three others my age with T1D.   It wasn’t until I started college last year that I was connected with over a dozen others around my age with T1D through The College Diabetes Network (CDN) Chapter at Ball State University. After I joined this organization, the rapport that ensued was like a true breath of fresh air. I finally had others with whom I could truly relate to, and I have learned a great amount from these individuals since T1D is managed in a plethora of different ways.Since starting college and meeting others with whom I can truly connect, I have been looking for more opportunities and ways to support, advocate, and expand my knowledge about type 1 diabetes. However, that can get a little tricky when one doesn’t know where to start. Add becoming co-president of a CDN Chapter to that mix and one just might have to search for an instruction manual.The aforementioned instruction manual came to me like a...
A Note from our Founder, Christina:We are excited to share our new Strategic Plan for 2018-2020! This plan builds on the community, resources, and partnerships we have worked so hard to grow since we got started way back in 2009.Developing this strategy, looking back at how far we have come, and setting goals for what we will accomplish by our 10 year anniversary in 2020 was honestly exhausting….we’ve done a lot….but laying out our goals for the coming years was also invigorating. The CDN Organization that we all know (and love) today, is a product of so many people. So much of our plan for the coming years, is building on partnerships to create change that will impact hundreds of thousands of young adults for years to come, change which I never could have imagined several years ago.So I truly couldn’t be more excited to share our new plan for the coming years with you! My role as CEO has evolved since our founding, going from volunteer to a variety of focuses leading the organization through its start-up years, and now into our most important years yet. Of all the experiences I have had so far- I am most excited...

Welcome, Anna!

Oh hey there!My name is Anna Floreen Sabino and I'm new here. I recently (aka this week) joined the CDN team as the Special Projects Manager and am excited to hone in on the area of the T1D space that I am most passionate about- empowering teens and young adults with T1D to aspire and thrive despite living with a chronic illness. As I dig in to my role I'm really excited to specifically be focusing on CDN's newly launched strategic plan- building on the community, resources, and partnerships the CDN team has worked so hard to grow since CDN originally got started back in 2009. All of that is to say- we are excited to foster an organization which: Understands the barriers faced by the transitioning young adult population and has the tools and direction to assist young adults in overcoming these barriers.Advocates on behalf of young adults with T1D, leveraging a reputation of excellence and collaborative strategic alliances to ensure our members’ voices are heard across the sector.Creates an environment rich with opportunities for passionate young leaders to pursue inspiring careers in the diabetes sector.After 5 years working at the T1D Exchange I'm looking forward to utilizing all I...

Studying at Sea with T1D

Thirty-five glucagon. Thirty-five. I’d heard the hesitation in my endocrinologist’s voice as she prescribed them, wondering what sort of mess I was getting myself into this time around. I’d seen the skepticism on the face of the pharmacist who handed over the bag full of the red containers and the unasked questions.I didn’t care. If carrying around an extra backpack stuffed with syringes, Omnipods, CGM kits, and test strips was the cost for my impending adventure, I would gladly pay it. After all, how many people get to spend a month sailing across the deep, open waters of the Atlantic? How many people get to experience the boundless joy of hanging from the rigging of a tall ship, or of swimming a thousand miles from the nearest land?And among those limited few, how many of these were a type one diabetic?Well, judging by the worry of my parents, endocrinologist, and the medical board of my study abroad program, not many. Now, my family and doctors are used to this sort of thing; I have a (in my opinion, wonderful, in their opinion, stress-inducing) habit of running off to the remote corners of our world, out of contact and certainly out...
What were you doing on November 6, 2007?  How old were you?  On November 6, 2007, I was diagnosed with type one diabetes (T1D).  I was eleven years old.  Ten years later, I am finally able to fully look back and reflect on the biggest life-changing event that has happened to me so far.November 1, 2007 was about the time when symptoms started to become noticeable.  I spent each night chugging down at least three bottles of water as I woke up sporadically from my extremely uncomfortable dry mouth. Unsurprisingly, I was also moseying my way to the bathroom over three times each night. As a sixth grader, I was starting to face body image issues as well.  My body was changing and I was not too pleased with the results.  However, because a symptom of type one diabetes is drastic weight loss, you could actually see my ribs poking out of my torso. Yet, I was still unhappy and found things I didn’t like.Before I knew it, I was in the bathroom yet again, getting ready for our church’s Sunday morning service.  This time, I was physically unable to get up from the toilet seat. My body was failing...
Question How do I tell my roommate about my diabetes? Should I be sensitive about it, or just tell her my needs?Answer Abbey: Everyone approaches telling their roommates a little differently. I am not sensitive about it and nor should you be! I commute to school and live at home; however, this is a topic we have talked about multiple times at our CDN Chapter meetings. I will share ‘roommate stories’ from the perspective of two different group members.One girl told her roommate the first day they moved in. Naturally, her roommate started to ask questions, and the conversation became very natural. Throughout their first year together, the  roommate started to really learn and become interested in understanding all of the ins-and- outs of type one. The girl said that coming out and just stating that she had type one diabetes was the best decision, because now her roommate (who is still her roommate in their junior year) is someone that receives her Dexcom alerts, and understands what to do in almost every situation. She feels as though sharing her diabetes with her roommate made them closer, and makes her feel more comfortable at school.Another girl in my group was not as...

The Lowdown

I’ve had type 1 diabetes for about eleven and a half years. I was lucky in my diagnosis in that it was caught relatively early. To this day, I have (very fortunately) never had a harrowing experience with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), however, I cannot say the same for incapacitating hypoglycemic episodes.In fact, I’ve had more than a few. The first time I ever had one of these terrifying lows was eight years after my diagnosis. I was in high school, home sick, during exam season. My dad was working from home, but I had been pretty tired, stressed, and moody (typical high schooler). So he left me alone for most of the day. However, he was unaware that I was sleeping through a low, one that quickly spiraled out of my control. I remember through a dream-like haze that he was on the phone with my mom, panic in his voice, fumbling with the glucagon. He had no idea how to use the thing. I don’t even remember him coming to wake me up, but I guess I had been unresponsive. When he had finally gotten a response from me, it was like talking to an alien. My words were...

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From The Blog

Courtney, CDN Chapter Leader, blogs about her experience so far at the CDN Retreat 2017!
Elias tells us about his experience using Afrezza Inhaled Insulin during college.
Emma, CDNs past high school summer intern, tells us what it's like touring schools with T1D considerations in mind.

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